2012-2013 Catalog & Handbook 
    
    Aug 03, 2020  
2012-2013 Catalog & Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


General Information

Learning support prerequisites: Enrollment in most college-level courses requires qualifying test scores or completion of learning support coursework. To determine eligibility for college-level courses, students who have tested into learning support courses should check the advising chart in the Academic Information and Services section of the Catalog or on the following Web page: www.pstcc.edu/departments/curriculum_and_instruction/advising/dsp.

Tennessee Board of Regents designations: Courses denoted with the ♦ symbol are general education courses transferable within the Tennessee Board of Regents system. Every TBR institution incorporates a common 41-hour general education core into its degree requirements and accepts all courses designated with the ♦ symbol as meeting these requirements. A complete matrix of courses that satisfy general education requirements at all TBR institutions is available on the TBR Web page, www.tbr.edu.

University of Tennessee designations: Courses denoted with the ★ symbol are Pellissippi State courses that receive direct course equivalency at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

 

Communication Graphics Technology

  
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    CGT 1950 - Design Fundamentals

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of visual design fundamentals, creative problem solving techniques, color theory application and concept development for graphic design. Emphasis will be placed on visual literacy development, presentation techniques, craftsmanship and computer skill development using graphic design industry standard software.

    Corequisite(s): ART 1045  and CGT 1030 

  
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    CGT 2005 - Digital Graphic Design II

    Credit(s): 4
    The study of advertising design, including design research, creative strategies development, visual/verbal concepts and presentation skills. Individual and team projects.

    Prerequisite(s): CGT 1105  and successful portfolio review

  
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    CGT 2040 - Computer Illustration

    Credit(s): 3
    Creating electronic renderings for visual communications. Infographics, product, editorial and conceptual imaging are explored.

    Prerequisite(s): CGT 1040  and CGT 1105  and CGT 1110 

  
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    CGT 2045 - Advanced Photoshop

    Credit(s): 3
    An advanced study of photographic concepts, image enhancement, digital image editing techniques and processes for visual communication. Includes beyond-the-basics skill development with Adobe Photoshop software.

    Prerequisite(s): CGT 1040  or MDT 2100 ; and CGT 2040 ; or consent of program coordinator

  
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    CGT 2050 - Special Projects

    Credit(s): 1-3
    Special projects and applications in emerging technology and media. May be repeated up to 9 credits.

    Corequisite(s): CGT 1105  or consent of program coordinator

  
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    CGT 2105 - Digital Graphic Design III

    Credit(s): 4
    Advanced graphic design. Comprehensive projects to include design management, development and production. Professional portfolio/student exhibition.

    Prerequisite(s): CGT 2005  or consent of program coordinator

  
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    CGT 2140 - Desktop Publishing

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of electronic publishing, including the integration of text and graphics. A functional lab will be included as a component of the course.

    Prerequisite(s): Consent of program coordinator

  
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    CGT 2160 - 3D Modeling & Animation

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of advanced three-dimensional design and animation. Virtual modeling techniques and the basics of 3D motion will be emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): CGT 1105  and CGT 2040 ; or consent of program coordinator

  
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    CGT 2240 - Advanced Computer Illustration

    Credit(s): 3
    An advanced study in creating electronic renderings for visual communications. Infographics, product, editorial and conceptual imaging are explored in depth.

    Corequisite(s): CGT 1040  and CGT 1105  and CGT 2040 


Computer Science and Information Technology

  
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    CISP 1010 - Computer Science I ★

    Credit(s): 4
    Problem solving and algorithm development. Organization and characteristics of modern digital computers. Emphasis on developing good programming habits. Building abstractions with procedures and data. Programming in a modern computing language. Program development using Unix operating system.

    Corequisite(s): MATH 1530  or MATH 1730 

    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  
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    CISP 1020 - Computer Science II ★

    Credit(s): 4
    Advanced problem solving and algorithm development, structured programming, data structures and applications, I/O techniques, lists, queues, trees, algorithms, and files. Program development using Unix operating system.

    Prerequisite(s): CISP 1010 

    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  
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    CISP 1550 - C++ Programming

    Credit(s): 3
    An introduction to C++ programming concepts and problem-solving using an object-oriented approach. Problem analysis; design concepts; code formulation; command, statement, and programming structures; internal and external data utilization; and application development are included in the course.

  
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    CISP 2410 - Assembly & Computer Organization ★

    Credit(s): 4
    Number systems, Boolean algebra, combinational and sequential circuits, processor functional units and control, pipelining, memory and caching, stored program computing, memory management, computer system organization, and assembly language programming are components of the course.

    Prerequisite(s): CISP 1010  or CSIT 1510 

    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  
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    CSIT 1000 - Introduction to Computers & Computing ★

    Credit(s): 3
    This course is a broad introduction to the use of computers as tools for creativity, communications, organizing information and problem-solving.

    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  
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    CSIT 1050 - Programming for Engineering Transfer ★

    Credit(s): 1
    Computer programming using C++ for engineering problem solving. Introduction to computer programming concepts, problem analysis, code formulation, engineering data utilization and applications.

    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  
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    CSIT 1110 - Introduction to Information Technology ★

    Credit(s): 4
    A first course in computer science and information technology, providing a comprehensive overview of computer architecture, data organization and communication. This course includes problem solving, logic design, personal computing, operating systems and application software.

    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  
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    CSIT 1300 - Problem Solving for Engineering Transfer ★

    Credit(s): 2
    Application of computers to engineering problem solving. Introduction to computer mathematical tools, problem analysis, code formulation, engineering data plotting and simulations. Solutions of engineering problems using MatLab.

    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  
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    CSIT 1510 - Introduction to Programming Using Java

    Credit(s): 4
    A study of the Java programming language, object-oriented programming, design and algorithm development. Topics include language structure and syntax, methods, program control statements, classes, strings, arrays, and applets.

    Corequisite(s): CSIT 1110 

  
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    CSIT 1520 - Intermediate Java Programming

    Credit(s): 4
    A study in Java language techniques beyond the introductory course. Emphasis will include object-oriented design, arrays, GUI and event-driven programming, exceptions and Java packages for collections, file I/O, and database connectivity.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1510  or Java programming experience

  
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    CSIT 1710 - A+ Computer Hardware

    Credit(s): 4
    This course is designed for computer personnel who need advanced technical knowledge about PC hardware and PC-based local area networks. The course follows the current Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) A+ (Core Hardware exam) certification criteria guidelines. The course also covers basic computer-related mathematics, electricity, electronics, fiber optics, etc., required for personal computer technologists.

  
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    CSIT 1720 - A+ Computer Software

    Credit(s): 4
    This course is designed for computer personnel who need advanced technical knowledge about the PC, its operating system and key utilities, and PC-based local area networks. The course follows the current Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) A+ certification criteria guidelines for the Operating Systems examination.

  
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    CSIT 1730 - Networking Fundamentals

    Credit(s): 4
    This course is designed to prepare students for the Network+ exam of CompTIA. Topics include network technologies, network media and topologies, network devices and tools, network management and troubleshooting techniques, and network security.

  
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    CSIT 1740 - Windows Professional

    Credit(s): 4
    This course covers installing the current Microsoft Windows client operating systems; implementing and conducting administration of resources; implementing, managing, and troubleshooting hardware devices and drivers, network protocols, and security; monitoring and optimizing performance and reliability; and configuring and troubleshooting the desktop environment.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1720 

  
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    CSIT 1810 - Introduction to Database Design

    Credit(s): 4
    A study of database management systems and their impact on information technology. Topics include database models, data modeling techniques, conceptual and physical design, storage techniques, and data administration. Special emphasis will be placed on relational systems and application of query languages using relational operations.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1110  or WEB 2010 

  
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    CSIT 2210 - Visual Basic Programming W/Lab

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of Windows graphic interface development through the learning and hands-on application of Visual BASIC programming language. The learner will develop, design, code, and test graphic sessions, images, windows, mouse selections, data usage, and image movements to produce client-based working programs. Emphasis will be on code creation, sound programming practice, window control and graphic design. Development of working client-based products is essential to the completion of this course.

    Prerequisite(s): One programming course

  
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    CSIT 2220 - C# Programming

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of object-oriented programming through the use and practical application of C# language. Topics include classes, objects, methods, GUI programming, graphics, databases, XML, Web pages and internet.

    Prerequisite(s): One programming course

  
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    CSIT 2230 - Introduction to Internet Software Development ★

    Credit(s): 3
    The history, growth and use of the internet are explored, and major internet protocols are discussed. Students use CSS, Java Script, Perl, PHP and other techniques to create dynamic Web content.

    Prerequisite(s): One programming course

    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  
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    CSIT 2240 - Game & 3D Simulation Programming

    Credit(s): 3
    Students will apply programming concepts and skills for simulation and game-based product development using a selected programming language or commercial development tool. Students will use a professional-level game programming/scripting development product set to create user-based simulation and game end-products.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1520 

  
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    CSIT 2250 - Mobile Application Development

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of mobile computing devices with emphasis on development of mobile applications using the Android platform. Topics include mobile computing hardware and technologies, Android development environment, application components, user interface design principles and APIs.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1520 

  
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    CSIT 2260 - Special Topics in Information Technology

    Credit(s): 3
    A directed study and utilization of specific hardware, applications and software products within business and industry. This course requires extensive utilization of specific computer resources. Students may expect a high degree of lab work and documentation.

    Prerequisite(s): Department approval

  
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    CSIT 2270 - Advanced Java Programming

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of the Java programming language to design advanced graphical user interfaces and Web-enabled applications. Topics include JavaBeans, internationalization, Java GUI design, APIs and advanced Java database programming. Java Servlets, JavaServer Pages and JavaServer Faces. The emphasis is on design and development of usable software products and documents through team projects.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1520 , CSIT 1810 

  
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    CSIT 2280 - Introduction to Scripting Languages

    Credit(s): 3
    An introduction to script programming as a tool for system administration, automation, and customization and as a platform for Web-based applications. Compares shell command languages and scripting languages used on Unix and Linux systems.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1510 

  
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    CSIT 2290 - Advanced .Net Programming

    Credit(s): 3
    This course is designed for applications programmers and database developers. Hands-on training includes use of the Visual Studio Integrated Development Environment (IDE), the .NET Framework (ASP.NET, ADO.NET, .NET programming), Object-Oriented Programming (OOP), database programming, SQL and Web Services. Students will develop an application involving a MSSQL Server database with emphasis on object-oriented and component-based approaches.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1520 , CSIT 1810  and either CSIT 2210  or CSIT 2220 

  
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    CSIT 2510 - Advanced Database Management Systems

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of database management system concepts. Topics include relational and object-oriented models, conceptual design, data structures, storage techniques, data administration, system security, concurrent transactions, distributed systems, multi-tiered architectures, data warehousing, and data mining. Practical application of techniques may include advanced application of query languages, remote access, database administration and user support.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1810 

  
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    CSIT 2520 - SQL Applications Using Oracle

    Credit(s): 3
    A comprehensive study of SQL using the Oracle relational database management system. Hands-on training will include database creation and management, data queries, view definition and use, operators and functions, procedures, security, calculation, indexing, utilities and data transport.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1810 

  
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    CSIT 2530 - Web Database Application Development

    Credit(s): 3
    This course is designed for applications programmers and database developers to create interactive Web sites to store and retrieve data. Topics include object-oriented application development, relational table creation and maintenance, data cleansing and validation, data manipulation, forms and reports, queries, stored procedures, optimization, and security. Hands-on training includes design and development of dynamic Web pages using PHP and SQL.

    Prerequisite(s): One programming course or WEB 2300 , and CSIT 1810 

  
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    CSIT 2710 - Windows Server

    Credit(s): 4
    Topics include the installation of the current Microsoft Windows server operating systems; installing, configuring and troubleshooting access to resources; configuring and troubleshooting hardware devices and drivers; managing, monitoring and optimizing system performance, reliability and availability; managing, configuring and troubleshooting storage use; configuring and troubleshooting Windows network connections; and implementing, monitoring and troubleshooting security.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1740 

  
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    CSIT 2720 - Network Security

    Credit(s): 3
    This course provides instruction in the analysis of business requirements for resource security and the design of security solutions in a network operating system. Topics include analyzing business and security requirements and designing security solutions for Windows for access between networks and for communication channels.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1740 

  
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    CSIT 2750 - Routing/Switching Configuration

    Credit(s): 4
    This course is designed to prepare students for the Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) exam and to provide skills to plan, install, operate and troubleshoot small to medium-size networks.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1730 

  
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    CSIT 2770 - Wireless Technology

    Credit(s): 4
    A study of wireless communication systems. Topics include principles of radio frequency and Wi-Fi, modulation/demodulation, testing equipment, security, coding, antennas, wireless system electronics and wireless optical systems.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1730 

  
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    CSIT 2840 - Systems Analysis & Design

    Credit(s): 3
    This course examines established and evolving methodologies for the analysis, design, and development of a business information system. Students practice software engineering principles and documentation techniques through team projects. Emphasis is placed on business systems characteristics, prototyping, CASE tools and SDLC phases.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 2520  or CSIT programming course or department approval; and CSIT 1810  and ENGL 1010 

  
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    CSIT 2850 - Capstone Lab

    Credit(s): 2
    In this project-centered course, students apply conceptual and technical knowledge acquired during their entire program of study to develop a complete IT-based solution for a client organization. Students practice software engineering principles, various methods, tools, techniques and documentation through team projects. Emphasis is placed on business systems’ characteristics, prototyping and SDLC phases. This course should be taken during the final semester.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 2840 ; CSIT 2520  or CSIT programming course; and ENGL 1010 

  
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    CSIT 2860 - Computer Organization & Architecture

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of computer organization. Topics include organization, architecture, number systems, storage concepts, I/O, memory management and process management.

    Prerequisite(s): CSIT 1520 

  
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    CSIT 2911 - Computer Science & Information Technology Internship

    Credit(s): 3
    This course is a supervised work experience requiring a minimum of 135 hours in the field of computer science and information technology. Individual conferences are arranged instead of class attendance.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 20 hours of CSIT courses with a minimum 2.5 GPA in CSIT courses; pursuit of an A.A.S. degree as a CSIT major; a completed internship application submitted to the coordinator of Business and Computer Technology internships prior to the beginning of the enrolled term. Application is available on the Web: www.pstcc.edu/departments/bctpi.


Culinary Arts

  
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    CULN 1000 - Kitchen Skills I

    Credit(s): 1
    This introductory culinary course prepares students to learn the science of the palate, knife skills, including use and maintenance, and the development of stocks and basic soups.

  
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    CULN 1100 - Kitchen Skills II

    Credit(s): 1
    This course studies in detail the preparation and use of the five basic sauces, or Mother Sauces, upon which all classical compound sauces are based. The course will finish with the introduction of contemporary applications of these sauces and the exploration of modern and international versions of sauces such as vinaigrettes, purees, reductions and emulsions that are prevalent in multiple soup recipes.

    Prerequisite(s): CULN 1000 

  
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    CULN 1200 - Kitchen Skills III

    Credit(s): 2
    This course covers the principles of cooking in detail. Dry-heat cooking methods (broiling/grilling, roasting, baking, sautéing, pan-frying and deep-frying) and moist-heat cooking methods (poaching, steaming, boiling, braising and stewing) are stressed. From this foundation the student learns to identify various vegetables, legumes, rice and other grains and to properly prepare them using the methods covered above.

    Prerequisite(s): CULN 1000  and CULN 1100 

  
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    CULN 1300 - Kitchen Skills IV

    Credit(s): 2
    This course covers the principles of cooking in detail. Dry-heat cooking methods (broiling/grilling, roasting, baking, sautéing, pan-frying and deep-frying) and moist-heat cooking methods (poaching, steaming, boiling, braising, stewing) are stressed. From this foundation the student learns to identify various cuts of meats, poultry, and fish and demonstrate how to select the proper preparation techniques for these food items. Attention is paid to the proper balance of flavors and textures of components within one meal or dish.

    Prerequisite(s): CULN 1200 

  
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    CULN 1400 - Garde Manger I

    Credit(s): 2
    This course provides the student with a foundation in Garde Manger or the cold kitchen. Basic salad preparations, vinaigrettes, emulsified and non-emulsified dressings, cold sauces, salad condiments, sandwiches, canapés, cold hors d’oeuvres, desserts and their proper uses are covered. This course emphasizes skill in the use of a variety of products and basic production methods.

    Prerequisite(s): CULN 1300 

  
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    CULN 1500 - Garde Manger II

    Credit(s): 2
    Through demonstration, lecture and hands-on techniques, the student further refines cold preparation skills and begins an emphasis on classical and modern presentation techniques. Appropriate garnishes and their preparation are demonstrated by the chef instructor and then practiced by the class. This unit includes ice carving demonstrations and practical sculpting.

    Prerequisite(s): CULN 1400 

  
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    CULN 2000 - International Cooking

    Credit(s): 2
    This course examines and demonstrates international cooking styles and reiterates the cooking procedures learned in the Kitchen Skills courses. International recipes are prepared. Skill in the use of international ingredients and basic production methods is emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): CULN 1300 

  
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    CULN 2100 - Breakfast Cookery

    Credit(s): 2
    This course teaches the fundamental preparations and techniques to prepare breakfast items for this segment of the culinary industry.

    Prerequisite(s): CULN 2000 

  
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    CULN 2200 - Baking Skills I

    Credit(s): 2
    This introduction to basic bread making and pastry techniques includes baguettes, soft rolls and pizza. Students learn a variety of doughs as well as pastry cream and other pie and tart fillings.

    Prerequisite(s): CULN 1000  and CULN 1100 

  
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    CULN 2300 - Baking Skills II

    Credit(s): 2
    This course continues the baking skills series by concentrating on the study of muffins, quick breads, scones and biscuits. Basic cakes and cream-based icings are covered.

    Prerequisite(s): CULN 2200 

  
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    CULN 2500 - Culinary Internship

    Credit(s): 3
    This course is a supervised work experience in the culinary field requiring a minimum of 400 work hours. Work activities can range from entry-level to professional cooking. Individual conferences are arranged instead of class attendance. Grade P/NP.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 15 hours of CULN courses, with a minimum 2.5 GPA in CULN courses and at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA; pursuit of an A.A.S. degree as a Culinary Arts student; a completed internship application submitted to the coordinator of BCT Internships prior to the beginning of the enrolled term. Application and instructions are available on the Web: www.pstcc.edu/departments/bctpi.


Early Childhood Education

  
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    ECED 1010 - Orientation to Early Childhood Education

    Credit(s): 2
    Introduces the student to the early childhood education profession and the basic skills needed for a successful academic career. Topics include professionalism, family relationships, individual and cultural diversity, child development, developmentally appropriate practice, observation and assessment, learning environment, health and safety, and guidance. Students study the different types of early childhood programs, community resources and professional organizations.

  
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    ECED 2010 - Safe, Healthy Learning Environments

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of the basic principles of good health as they relate to the child in the family, child care center, or family child-care home, and the community. Includes child nutrition, growth, disease and accident prevention, and safety. Also included is a study of principles of creating appropriate learning environments for young children. Laboratory observation and interaction.

  
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    ECED 2015 - Early Childhood Curriculum

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of developmentally appropriate practices and the teacher’s role in supporting the development of young children (birth through age 8). Emphasis is on curriculum planning, including goals, environment, roles of teachers and parents, materials, and settings.

    Field experience required.
  
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    ECED 2020 - Infant, Toddler & Child Development

    Credit(s): 3
    The study of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of young children and their application to the care, guidance, and development of the young child (birth through age 8).

  
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    ECED 2030 - Infant & Toddler Care

    Credit(s): 3
    A course in methods of providing safe, competent individual and group care, as well as a warm and secure emotional atmosphere for infants and toddlers. Includes procedures for stimulating the intellectual and physical development of infants and toddlers in addition to basic care-giving skills.

    Course open to non-majors (i.e. parents, parent-to-be, baby-sitters).
  
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    ECED 2040 - Family Dynamics & Community Involvement

    Credit(s): 3
    The role of the family and community in the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional growth of the child in a diverse society. The areas of professionalism, program management, advocacy, and family development and the structure of the family will be the main topics. Building partnerships with families of children with special needs will also be included. Laboratory observation and interaction.

  
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    ECED 2050 - Psychomotor Development

    Credit(s): 3
    The major theories of psychomotor development and the application to the development of the young child. Particular emphasis is placed on the positive development of motor skills. Laboratory observation and interaction.

    Prerequisite(s): ECED 2020 

  
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    ECED 2060 - Development of Exceptional Children

    Credit(s): 3
    This course covers physical disabilities, mental retardation, sensory impairment, the gifted child, and the accessing and coordinating of community resources to ensure accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment and services. Students will learn to interpret diagnostic instruments and to write programs to meet the special needs of exceptional children. Laboratory observation and interaction.

  
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    ECED 2070 - Developmental Assessment

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of the basic instruments and checklists leading to competency in screening children for developmental problems. The course will also consider appropriate community support programs and referral procedures. Laboratory observation and interaction.

  
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    ECED 2080 - Language & Literacy Development in Early Childhood

    Credit(s): 3
    This course outlines the research-based principles and practices for providing young children (birth through age 8) a strong foundation in language and literacy within a developmentally appropriate approach.

    Prerequisite(s): ECED 2015  and ECED 2020 ; or department approval

  
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    ECED 2085 - Math & Science in Early Childhood

    Credit(s): 3
    A course on the standards, principles, and practices in teaching mathematics and science to young children (birth through age 8). Emphasis is on developing an integrated math and science curriculum that includes appropriate content, processes, environment and materials, and child-centered choices.

    Prerequisite(s): ECED 2015 , ECED 2020 ; department approval

  
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    ECED 2090 - Creative Development

    Credit(s): 3
    A course dealing with theories, teaching techniques, and basic program components of early childhood art instruction. Emphasizes value of art in physical-mental and social-emotional growth of young children. Explores use of art media, creative play activities, and methods of incorporating creativity into other curricular areas.

  
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    ECED 2100 - The Mentoring Teacher

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of the philosophy, principles, and methods of mentoring adults who have varying levels of training. Emphasis will be on the role of mentors as facilitators of adult learning while simultaneously addressing the needs of children, parents, and other staff.

    Prerequisite(s): Department approval

  
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    ECED 2110 - Advanced Learning Environments

    Credit(s): 3
    This course focuses on the skill, knowledge, and materials development which are necessary in the provision of a developmentally appropriate environment for young children. Laboratory observation and interaction.

    Prerequisite(s): ECED 2010  and ECED 2015 

  
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    ECED 2120 - Administration of Child Care Centers

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of organization and administration practices applicable to the child care center. Topics of special consideration will be staff-management relations, state and local licensing standards, national accreditation, CDA standards, tax laws, legal liabilities, and the effect these topics will have on the care of the child. Laboratory observation and interaction.

  
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    ECED 2130 - Initial Practicum

    Credit(s): 3
    Supervised practicum with a minimum of 30 clock hours in seminar and 45 clock hours in early childhood practical experiences. Course includes a study of the physical and human qualities that combine to create an environment that is safe and healthy and that promotes optimal learning for young children (birth through age 8).

    Corequisite(s): ECED 2010  or department approval

  
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    ECED 2160 - Final Practicum

    Credit(s): 3
    Supervised clinical experience with a minimum of 15 clock hours in seminar and 90 clock hours in a clinical site approved by the department (accredited agency, three-star department-approved site). Up to 45 clock hours may be completed in the student’s employment site with department approval. Course focuses on the student’s demonstration of competencies that produce positive developmental outcomes for young children (birth through age 8).

    Prerequisite(s): ECED 2130 


Economics

  
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    ECON 2010 - Macroeconomics ♦ ★

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of basic macroeconomic concepts, including gross domestic product, economic growth, unemployment and inflation. Also includes a thorough examination of both fiscal and monetary policy.

    Corequisite(s): College-level math

    ♦ This is a general education course transferable within the Tennessee Board of Regents system.
    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  
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    ECON 2020 - Microeconomics ♦ ★

    Credit(s): 3
    A study of consumer behavior, the product and resource markets and the role of the government in business. Also includes an examination of market structure, resource economics, wage determination and distribution and international trade.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 2010 

    ♦ This is a general education course transferable within the Tennessee Board of Regents system.
    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Education

  
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    EDU 2010 - Introduction to Teaching & Technology

    Credit(s): 3
    An overview of school in America, the role and responsibility of the teacher, and an introduction to instructional technology principles and practices. The course combines classroom discussion with field observations as a means to analyze the teaching profession.

    Corequisite(s): ENGL 1010 


Electrical Engineering

  
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    ECE 2010 - Circuits I ★

    Credit(s): 3
    Fundamental laws of circuit analysis: Ohm’s law, Kirchoff’s voltage and current laws and the law of conservation of energy; circuits containing independent and dependent voltage and current sources; resistance, conductance, capacitance and inductance analyzed using mesh and nodal analysis, superposition and source transformations and Norton’s and Thevenin’s theorems; steady state analysis of DC and AC circuits; complete solution for transient analysis for circuits with one and two storage elements.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 1920 ; CHEM 1110  and CSIT 1050 

    Corequisite(s): PHYS 2110 

    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  
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    ECE 2020 - Circuits II W/Lab ★

    Credit(s): 4
    Average, complex, real and imaginary power; effective value of voltage and current; three-phase circuits; delta and wye connections, power measurement using two watt meters; complex frequency; sinusoidal forcing functions and natural response; resonance: general case, special cases in series and parallel circuits; scaling: magnitude and frequency; mutual inductance transformers as circuit elements; linear and ideal transformers as circuit elements; linear and ideal transformers; admittance, impedance and hybrid parameters; trigonometric and complex Fourier series. Course includes 3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory applications each week.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 2010 

    Corequisite(s): MATH 2110  and PHYS 2120 

    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Electrical Engineering Technology

  
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    EET 1001 - Introduction to Electrical Engineering Technology

    Credit(s): 1
    Emphasis on introduction to electronic equipment, components, and software, focusing on the application of the multimeter, oscilloscope, function generator, power supply, and circuit simulation software. Practical soldering techniques are introduced and practiced. Discussion includes modern electronic systems, such as a microcontroller and a variety of electronic sensors, and an introduction to robotics.

  
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    EET 1012 - Electrical Circuits I W/Lab

    Credit(s): 3
    An introductory course in DC and AC circuits. Topics include atomic structure, current and voltage, resistance and power. Ohm’s Law and series and parallel circuits are covered. Transient response for capacitors and inductors are also discussed. The course includes fundamental AC concepts and phasor calculations for impedance, voltage, and current in RLC circuits. There will also be discussion of ladder logic and introduction to motors and transformers.

  
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    EET 1055 - Industrial Electricity

    Credit(s): 3
    An introductory course in industrial power systems, AC and DC motor theory and applications, motor control techniques, and variable-speed drive applications. Topics include phasor concepts, single and three-phase power system components and computations, delta and wye circuits, transformer theory and applications, AC motors (induction, wound rotor, synchronous), and DC motors (series, shunt, compound motors).

  
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    EET 1210 - Active Devices I W/Lab

    Credit(s): 4
    An introductory course in solid-state devices and the basic circuits in which they are used. Topics include semiconductor physics, diode circuits, bipolar transistor circuit analysis, FET circuit analysis and Op-Amp basics and uses.

    Prerequisite(s): EET 1012 

  
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    EET 1310 - Digital Fundamentals W/Lab

    Credit(s): 4
    A study of basic numbering systems, basic computer codes, Boolean algebra, basic logic gates, and logic simplification using Boolean algebra and Karnough maps. Topics include flip-flops, counters, shift registers, different types of memory (RAM, ROM, EPROM) and basic microprocessor principles.

  
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    EET 1410 - Electrical Safety Codes

    Credit(s): 1
    This course provides an interpretive survey of various codes as applied to the electrical construction industry, including the National Electrical Code (NFPA 70), with discussion of related safety organizations and their guidelines, including OSHA, IEEE, IEC, ISA, ANSI, and UL. Articles discussed include conductors, raceways, grounding, arc flash safety, short-circuit and ground fault protections, and overload protection, along with various circuit protection devices and schemes.

  
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    EET 1715 - Microcomputer Architecture

    Credit(s): 2
    This course provides an opportunity for students to obtain knowledge and skills necessary to service microcomputer hardware and supported peripherals. The course includes identifying parts of a PC; discussing the functions and interactions of all PC subsystems; identifying and troubleshooting common PC hardware problems; installing, replacing, and upgrading PC hardware components; and installing and troubleshooting PC peripherals such as video cameras and additional monitors.

  
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    EET 2235 - Instrumentation Technology

    Credit(s): 3
    Instrumentation technology provides a comprehensive coverage of components, circuits, instruments and control techniques used in the process control technology field. This course is ideal for students and technicians who will be installing, troubleshooting, repairing, tuning and calibrating instrumentation devices in manufacturing.

    Prerequisite(s): EET 1210 

  
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    EET 2430 - Robotics & Automation

    Credit(s): 3
    Basic robotics and automation principles, including sensor technology, motion principles, and microcontroller technology, are applied. Degrees of freedom, multi-axis motion, gripper technology and other robotic features are covered. Lab includes programming of robots, interfacing sensors, and troubleshooting basic hardware and software problems, as well as analog to digital converter and digital to analog converter applications.

    Prerequisite(s): EET 1310  or consent of program coordinator

  
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    EET 2655 - Applied Electricity

    Credit(s): 4
    This introductory course in the design of residential and commercial electrical systems covers basic principles of electricity, electrical wiring methods, code interpretation, service requirements, utilization voltages, print reading, electrical circuit design and three-phase power applications for commercial systems. Additional topics include electrical power generation, transmission and distribution, as well as distributed generation systems using alternative energy sources.

  
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    EET 2900 - Special Topics

    Credit(s): 1-4
    Special projects and applications in emerging technology. Content will vary, as this course is a means for classes to explore certain topics in depth not covered in the general curriculum. May be repeated up to 9 credits.

    Prerequisite(s): Consent of program coordinator

  
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    EET 2910 - Data Acquisition & Control

    Credit(s): 2
    LabVIEW will be emphasized in solving problems in instrumentation and control. This course covers basic data acquisition and control techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): EET 1210 

  
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    EET 2920 - Programmable Controllers

    Credit(s): 2
    An introductory course in programmable logic controllers (PLCs) and basic applications in which they are used. Topics include an overview of PLCs, PLC hardware components, basics of PLC programming, development of fundamental PLC wiring diagrams and ladder programs, programming timers and counters, advanced programming techniques, and PLC control of motors and processes.

    Prerequisite(s): EET 1012 

  
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    EET 2940 - Alternative Energy Conversions

    Credit(s): 2
    This course provides an introduction to a variety of residential and commercial distributed generation technologies, with an emphasis on photovoltaic systems. Topics include basic understanding of direct current and alternating current systems, electrical generation techniques, load assessment, system sizing, system installation, and technology applications. The course covers on-grid and off-grid systems. In addition, the course introduces the student to other alternative energy conversion techniques, such as wind technology, fuel cells and others.

    Prerequisite(s): EET 1012  or consent of program coordinator


Engineering Science

  
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    ENS 1510 - Engineering Fundamentals I ★

    Credit(s): 4
    Calculus-based study of basic physics concepts, including vectors, kinematics, Newton’s laws, work-energy and impulse-momentum. Introduction to teamwork. Introduction to the engineering disciplines, examination of engineering principles and design issues; oral and written presentation skills.

    Corequisite(s): MATH 1910 

    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  
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    ENS 1520 - Engineering Fundamentals II ★

    Credit(s): 4
    Calculus-based study of basic physics concepts, including statics, gravitation, oscillations, waves, fluid mechanics, heat and temperature, and first and second law of thermodynamics. Introduction to teamwork. Introduction to the engineering disciplines, examination of engineering principles and design issues; oral and written presentation skills.

    Prerequisite(s): ENS 1510  and MATH 1910 

    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  
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    ENS 2021 - Engineering Mechanics ★

    Credit(s): 2
    Review of vector algebra. Statics of two- and three-dimensional objects. Analysis of two-dimensional trusses and frames. Geometric properties of cross-sections, including first and second moments and location of centroid. Inertial properties of rigid bodies, including moment of inertia and location of mass center.

    Corequisite(s): ENS 1520 

    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
  
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    ENS 2110 - Statics

    Credit(s): 3
    Vectors, forces and moments; equivalent force systems; free body diagrams; equilibrium, frames, trusses, friction; and shear and bending moment diagrams.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 1920 

  
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    ENS 2310 - Dynamics ★

    Credit(s): 3
    Study of the kinetics and kinematics of rigid bodies. Also covered are such topics as centers of mass and mass moments of inertia.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 1920 

    Corequisite(s): ENS 1520 

    ★ This course is directly equivalent to a course at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Engineering Technology

  
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    ENGT 1010 - Engineering Technology Technical Communication

    Credit(s): 3
    The student learns the basic skills, knowledge and abilities to successfully communicate in the technical environment. Various applications for word processing, problem solving and graphing, along with generating presentation aids for required technical presentations, are covered. Outcomes are accomplished through project-based, hands-on use of computer applications required by the department, including email, internet, Windows, Excel, PowerPoint, Word and other program-specific software.

  
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    ENGT 2021 - Project Scheduling W/Lab

    Credit(s): 3
    This course covers methods used in planning, organizing and controlling construction projects. It includes the use of bar charts and critical path diagrams. Software is used to create project schedules. Emphasis is placed on time, resources and capital considerations for the project.

    Prerequisite(s): Second-year status or consent of program coordinator

  
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    ENGT 2995 - Engineering Technology Capstone

    Credit(s): 3
    A project or research-oriented course that emphasizes synthesis through collaborative learning. Students integrate and apply previous knowledge, skills and experiences they have learned in their major and other academic courses to complete a team-oriented project. The course emphasizes communication skills, critical thinking, problem solving, computer literacy and teaming skills.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be taken in the final semester or with coordinator approval


English

  
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    ENGL 0800 - Essential Writing

    Credit(s): 0
    Development of process-based writing strategies in preparation for college level courses across the curriculum as well as the workplace. The course emphasizes writing effective sentences, paragraphs and essays in various modes of delivery and rhetorical contexts.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement test

    Corequisite(s): ENGL 0801 , ENGL 0802 , ENGL 0803 , ENGL 0804 , ENGL 0805 

 

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